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Nigerian Farmwife Benefits From SALT Teaching

It was time to plant crops, but Christiana had no money to buy fertilizer and seeds. How could she feed her family without the produce from their farm? Her only option was to borrow money from people who often charged an excessive interest rate. Sometimes they demanded a portion of the new crop as interest for the loan.

Christiana, her husband Amos, and their six children live in a farming community in northeast Nigeria. Like many Nigerian farm families, they found themselves in a perpetual cycle of debt, barely paying off the previous year’s crop loan in time to plant the new crop.

But for Christiana, this all changed in 2018 when she joined a SALT Savings Group. She had heard about SALT from friends who told how the program had impacted their physical and spiritual lives.

Christiana started saving money at the biweekly savings group meetings. The teachings from SALT’s Small Business Manual helped her better manage her resources and understand the snare of high-interest loans. Now when she needs a loan, she borrows from her savings group.

Christiana thanks God for helping with her farming. With a loan from her savings group, she was able to buy fertilizer and other farming inputs. The last farming season was successful, and she paid back her loan.

This Nigerian mother also recognizes the spiritual blessings of being part of the savings group. “The teaching from the manual has helped me in my family, how to train my children in God’s way, and how to relate with people,” Christiana says. “I have learned how to . . . coach my children into becoming godly leaders.” She also says the teaching has helped her learn how to be a better housewife.

Christiana feels the SALT program is needed in Nigeria for several reasons:

• It teaches people how to save for the future.

• In this perverse generation, it is present at the right time to teach a godly way of life.

• It brings unity among communities through the meetings and teaching.


If you would like to help families and individuals in various countries learn to provide for themselves through SALT Microfinance, please click the donate button to give a gift.

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SALT member trusts God for business

Jesca had a small business of peddling used clothing before she moved to Tanzania, East Africa. Two years ago, Jesca joined a SALT Savings Group in her new country. Since then, she opened her own clothing store, using savings and a loan from the savings group. Several times a month, she travels to a larger town to purchase clothing for resale. God has blessed her business, and people are amazed at how many clothes she sells.

In Tanzania, some people practice witchcraft to try to ensure success in their trade. When Jesca was asked if she uses witchcraft to increase her sales, she responded, “No, I don’t use witchcraft; I trust God.”

To help support the SALT Microfinance Solutions program, please click the button below to give a gift.


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SALT helps a family in Nicaragua

SALT Microloan group, Christian Aid Ministries

Natanael and Elizabeth from Nicaragua joined a SALT Microloan group in February 2021. Financial teachings at the weekly meetings help them make wise decisions as they look for ways to increase their income. With a small business loan from their SALT Microloan group, the couple invested in supplies for Elizabeth’s sewing business. They also used part of the loan to buy supplies to raise pigs. 

Natanael and Elizabeth Téllez know firsthand what it’s like to run a small business in a developing country. Before joining the SALT Microloan group, lack of capital limited their possibility to expand and make needed equipment improvements. 

 Natanael works as a street vendor selling bread from a large basket mounted on his bike. He bikes about 18 miles a day to sell his bread in local communities. He hopes to save enough money this year to buy a motorbike to use instead of a bicycle. 

This year the couple also plans to improve their farmyard where they raise pigs, chickens, and geese. Sometime in the future, they want to add a cow to their little farm. Without the teachings and structure of the SALT program, many of these improvements to their small businesses and farm would be difficult to make on their own. 

 Natanael and Elizabeth report that the Biblical teaching from their microloan meetings are helping them grow spiritually. They are grateful to God for the help they have received through the SALT program.

To help support the SALT Microfinance Solutions program, please click the button below to give a gift.


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Beekeeping in Ghana

beekeepers, Christian Aid Ministries

Peter lives in Ghana, West Africa, and is one of seven beekeepers in a SALT Agri-Plus group. Before joining the group, Peter kept his bees in a traditional clay pot hive. He had to break the clay pot to extract the honey at harvest time, destroying the bees’ colony and forcing them to re-establish their hive after every harvest.

beekeepers, Christian Aid Ministries
One of Peter’s traditional clay pot beehive.

At each monthly SALT Agri-Plus meeting, Peter and the other members receive practical teaching on beekeeping. They learn how to harvest honey using specially designed concrete hives made by a local mason. Throughout each practical lesson, the SALT facilitators also weave Biblical truth.

Implementing this Agri-Plus training enables Peter to harvest twice as much honey as before, while preserving the bee colony. Because the honey is cleaner, its sales value is also higher. These changes are possible because of your support and interest. Thank you!

To help support the SALT Agri-Plus program program, please click the button below to give a gift.


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Marriage bond strengthened

marriage, Christian Aid Ministries

When Alex and Naomi from Asomdwee, Ghana, joined a SALT Savings Group, they didn’t realize it was likely the best thing that could happen to their marriage. They faced challenges in their marriage that stemmed from the lack of clear Biblical teaching and few examples of godly marriages. Alex and Naomi both exhibited behaviors that did not enhance their marriage.

The couple decided to put the Biblical teaching they received at their weekly SALT meetings into practice. Naomi is finding that the teaching helps her know how to be a good wife to Alex. In turn, Alex is learning to be a godly husband. They attest this has created a happy atmosphere in their home.

One thing Alex and Naomi learned is that marriage is like a threefold cord. To them, this means they must allow God to be part of their marriage. They said, “As a married couple [we] have to do things the right way . . . think of the same plans, have the same view, and also rely on God.” This has helped their marriage bond grow stronger than ever before.

Since becoming savings group members, Alex and Naomi no longer waste their money but use it wisely. Together they decide how to best use their finances. With their savings, they pay their children’s school tuition and plan ahead for other expenses. Several members of their savings group testified that the couple has made progress. They notice Naomi and Alex have become more industrious and are willing to help others in need.

Alex and Naomi say they are doing all they can to become one as the Bible teaches. They are trusting God to help them continue in their newfound life. They pray God would show them favor as they grow in love in their marriage and as a family. Let’s join Alex and Naomi in that prayer.

To help support the SALT Microfinance Solutions program, please click the button below to give a gift.


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SALT program grows in Niger

SALT program, Christian Aid Ministries

The year 2021 was a tough year for the SALT program in Niger. We launched the program in mid-2019 and added our second facilitator in mid-2020, only months before we were forced to leave due to security concerns.

By the beginning of 2022, we were all back in Niger ready to invest in the program. We organized regular facilitator meetings and addressed the problems plaguing the program be- cause of our absence. Our goal was to build a team spirit and impart a vision for the program. Through many prayers, God prospered the program beyond what we expected. Today we have 5 facilitators, 44 groups, and about 1,500 members.

Ninety-nine percent of the people in Niger profess to be Muslims, yet there is freedom for Christians to practice and share their faith. At a recent meeting, our facilitators shared how the SALT program provided them with opportunities to share Jesus with their communities. Following are some exciting stories from our facilitators.

From Boubacar, a facilitator who has really caught a vision for the program and has opened over a dozen new groups this year:

We don’t always get to talk about Jesus, but we just interact with people all the time and let them see Jesus in us. I can testify that since they spend time with us every week in the SALT meetings, their perspective of Christians has changed.

 From Pastor Omar:

Recently when I arrived at a meeting everyone was discussing a rich man who keeps marrying women and divorcing them. After a while, they turned to me and said, “You Christians don’t have those problems, do you? You just marry one wife and are happy together.”

 From Zangui, our first facilitator:

I try to pay attention to the SALT members at each meeting. If someone seems troubled, I reach out to them privately afterward. Often just the fact that you noticed and care about them will open their hearts.

 Stories like these are rewarding. Please join us in praying that God will take the seeds that are being sown and cause them to sprout for His glory.

—Rodney Yoder, SALT staff member in Niger

To help support the SALT Microfinance Solutions program, please click the button below to give a gift.


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Ukraine conflict approaches its one-year mark

Ukraine brick building damaged

The Ukraine conflict approaches its one-year mark the end of this month and is tragically still in full steam. Tanks, missiles, and fighter jets have become the norm in certain areas of the country. What is left of some towns and villages is only about ten percent of the buildings.

The overall economy suffers immensely. Thousands of people left the country, some permanently and others short term, which is one aspect that shook up the workforce. Many people still in the country are jobless. Some businesses shut down completely, and a large percent of those still open struggle to keep going.

CAM’s SALT program enables some Ukrainians to stay in business

The SALT program enabled Ukrainians to use their business skills long before the war, but it continues to play a vital role in helping people provide for themselves in these trying times.

Paul’s raspberry crop flourished last year.
Paul’s raspberry crop flourished last year.

Raspberry business

Paul planted 50 acres of raspberries in 2020 with the help of SALT. The harvest wasn’t large the first two years, but with experience, he majorly increased his crop last year.

“2022 was extremely difficult due to the war,” a SALT member shared. “But God blessed [Paul] and in one month he sold raspberries worth . . . more than his annual earnings last year [2021] and the year before last [2020].” Paul then shared some of his profits with other members of the SALT group who helped prune the raspberries.

A talented pastor carves wooden stands, plaques, and other things for Ukrainian homes.

Woodcarving business

A pastor from a village in Ukraine who is a member of a SALT Savings group started his own woodcarving business before the war. At the beginning of the conflict, he took his family to another country to ensure their safety. Recently they returned and the pastor continued his business to support his family. SALT members say his products are in high demand.

Tamila works with her father in their family baking business.
Tamila works with her father in their family baking business.

Family baking business

Eighteen-year-old Tamila is part of a SALT group, which teaches business opportunities and Biblical principles. Last January, someone gave her father some delicious homemade bread that gave him the idea of starting a family baking business.

Tamila’s mother perfected the recipe and taught her how to make bread. “I tried and I succeeded,” Tamila said. “I was very happy, because our family was always provided with fresh, tasty, healthy bread. After sharing the idea of homemade bread with friends, they started buying bread from us several times every week.”

The family hopes to expand the business, but power outages from the war is a major obstacle for them.

Tamila wrote, “We sincerely thank our friends from the program and SALT for their long-term support in training and good advice about the development of our business.”

If you would like to donate to the Ukraine Crisis Program, click here.

If you would like to donate to the SALT Microfinance Solutions Program, click here.

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SALT program grows in Niger

SALT program, Christian Aid Ministries

The year 2021 was a tough year for the SALT program in Niger. We launched the program in mid-2019 and added our second facilitator in mid-2020, only months before we were forced to leave due to security concerns.

By the beginning of 2022, we were all back in Niger ready to invest in the program. We organized regular facilitator meetings and addressed the problems plaguing the program be- cause of our absence. Our goal was to build a team spirit and impart a vision for the program. Through many prayers, God prospered the program beyond what we expected. Today we have 5 facilitators, 44 groups, and about 1,500 members.

Ninety-nine percent of the people in Niger profess to be Muslims, yet there is freedom for Christians to practice and share their faith. At a recent meeting, our facilitators shared how the SALT program provided them with opportunities to share Jesus with their communities. Following are some exciting stories from our facilitators.

From Boubacar, a facilitator who has really caught a vision for the program and has opened over a dozen new groups this year:

We don’t always get to talk about Jesus, but we just interact with people all the time and let them see Jesus in us. I can testify that since they spend time with us every week in the SALT meetings, their perspective of Christians has changed.

 From Pastor Omar:

Recently when I arrived at a meeting everyone was discussing a rich man who keeps marrying women and divorcing them. After a while, they turned to me and said, “You Christians don’t have those problems, do you? You just marry one wife and are happy together.”

 From Zangui, our first facilitator:

I try to pay attention to the SALT members at each meeting. If someone seems troubled, I reach out to them privately afterward. Often just the fact that you noticed and care about them will open their hearts.

 Stories like these are rewarding. Please join us in praying that God will take the seeds that are being sown and cause them to sprout for His glory.

—Rodney Yoder, SALT staff member in Niger

To help support the SALT Microfinance Solutions program, please click the button below to give a gift.


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Eleven years with SALT in Haiti

SALT in Haiti

Financial hardship plagued 25-year-old Geline* from Haiti. The little income she made from her roadside cosmetics stand seemed to slip through her fingers. She struggled to keep enough money on hand to buy the supplies she needed to keep her little store stocked. In addition to cash flow for her business, Geline needed money to help support her growing little family. What could she do to help make ends meet?

SALT in Haiti

One day she heard that a program called SALT was coming to their area. As many Haitians do, she likely wondered what benefits she could get from SALT. Maybe they would give her food or perhaps hand out cash for her business. At the first meeting where the SALT program was introduced, she learned the program would not be giving handouts. Instead, she would learn how to save and manage money. She also would learn the importance of applying the principles of God’s Word in everyday life. Hope rose within her. Perhaps this was the answer to the challenge of trying to make a living. In December 2011 Geline joined the new SALT Savings Group.

Eleven years later…

Eleven years later Geline looks back. God has been good. From the collective savings of her savings group, she took out a $150 loan to start a business selling fresh goat meat. ”With SALT I was able to launch this business,” said Geline. “Before SALT, I struggled to find capital to operate even a small business in cosmetics.”

When asked about the SALT teaching at the savings group meetings, she replied, ”I like the lessons because they are so practical. The facilitators take time to explain them well.”

Gangs and violence make life difficult in Haiti. It is dangerous to travel for fear of being robbed. Gas costs $15 to $20 a gallon. This is driving up the prices of food and other necessities. Because of these challenges, many missions were forced to leave Haiti. Thankfully the SALT program has been able to continue under the guidance of Haitian facilitators and managers. Many like Geline express their thankfulness to God for the opportunity and hope SALT has brought to their communities.

*Name is changed to protect identity.

To help support the SALT Microfinance Solutions program, please click the button below to give a gift.


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Cambodia: Navigating difficult business seasons

difficult business, Christian Aid Ministries

Tourists passing by Srey La’s store often stop in to check out her fresh coconut drink or colorful dresses and scarves. Srey La has a way of drawing them in before they explore the temples in her Cambodian village. She enjoys selling her goods to help complement her husband’s meager income.

Srey La did the best she knew to keep her business going during the tourism slump from COVID-19. But navigating through the business struggle was a challenge. During this time, she started noticing the SALT facilitators who often ate at the restaurant beside her. Srey La began asking them questions. It didn’t take long for her to become interested in a SALT savings group and the teaching the facilitators offered.

A new savings group began meeting in Srey La’s shop after she asked if it would be possible to start a group. Many of the shop owners near her joined, along with the local temple guards.

difficult business, Christian Aid Ministries
Srey La and her fellow group members enjoy a time of learning together.

The teaching Srey La received at the meetings kept her business going through difficult times. Not only did she keep her business going, but she also saved enough money to increase her inventory.

Recently, Srey La was able to use a loan from the savings group to replace the roof of her shop. She has already paid back
the loan.

Srey La and other members in her group rely heavily on the advice of the SALT facilitators as financial needs arise. CAM’s desire through the SALT program is to point people to the Gospel as SALT staff members walk beside them in their financial struggles. With God’s help and your prayer and financial support, this is made possible.

To help support the SALT Savings Groups program, please click the button below to give a gift.


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